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Welcome to contoso.se! My name is Anders Bengtsson and this is my blog about Azure infrastructure and system management. I am a senior engineer in the FastTrack for Azure team, part of Azure Engineering, at Microsoft.  Contoso.se has two main purposes, first as a platform to share information with the community and the second as a notebook for myself.

Everything you read here is my own personal opinion and any code is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties.

Anders Bengtsson

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MVP awarded 2007,2008,2009,2010

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Service Manager Unleashed
Service Manager Unleashed
Orchestrator Unleashed
Orchestrator 2012 Unleashed
OMS
Inside the Microsoft Operations Management Suite

Update Service Manager SLA thresholds with Orchestrator

From time to time I get the question if it is possible to pause a SLA in Service Manager. You should write your SLA in a way that you never have to think about pause them. For example if you have a SLA saying you will fix hardware issues in 8 hours, but your hardware vendor has agreement saying they will send you spare parts in 4 days, you need to re-write your SLA. Another example could be a SLA saying an incident will be resolved within 8 hours. If you are dependent on end-users that might be difficult to fulfill, instead write SLA based on first response. Why write a SLA that you can never fulfill?

In this blog post I will show how to modify the SLA endtime with a runbook. This runbook dont pause the SLA, it just adds minutes to the TargetEndDate and the TargetWarningDate for incidents in a “Waiting for end-user” status.

 

20130707_PauseSLA

  • Monitor Date/Time. The runbook trigger every 5 minutes
  • Get Object. Gets all incidents in “Waiting for end-user” status
  • Link. If there are more than one incident
  • Get Relationship. Gets related Service Level Instance Time Information
  • Get Object. Reads the Service Level Instance Time Information instance
  • Format Date/Time. Takes the current TargetEndDate as input and adds 5 minutes on Format Result output
  • Format Date/Time. Takes the current TargetWarningDate as input and adds 5 minutes on Format Result output
  • Update Object. Updates the related Service Level Instance Time Information instance with new TargetEndDate and TargetWarningDate

20130707_PauseSLA02

 

The result is that every 5 minutes when the incident is in “Waiting for end-user” state the runbook will add 5 minutes to both the SLA Warning time and the SLA End time. You can download my example file, PauseSLA_wolf. Note that this is provided “AS-IS” with no warranties at all. This is not a production ready management pack or solution, just a idea and an example

 


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